Top 10 Music Videos Filmed in London

It would be hard to find a modern song without a music video theses days, and where better to film it than the in the capital. We take a look at some of the best music videos filmed in London.

Top 10 Music Videos Filmed in London

We’re proud to be located in the heart of London’s South Bank. With such a rich musical heritage, buzzing music scene and a load of top venues, it’s pretty much the perfect place for a hi-fi brand. So we took to the streets, had a nosey around the city and compiled some of our favourite music videos shot right here in London.

 

1. The Verve – Bittersweet Symphony – Urban Hymns – Hoxton

The iconic, continuous movement of Richard Ashcroft walking along the streets of Hoxton is possibly one of the most easily recognisable music videos of all time. Ashcroft’s oblivious nature paired with the swagger of his walk has just as much attitude as the song itself. Despite only reaching Number 1 in Canada the song is instantly recognisable although it’s fair to say it may now have been overshadowed by the amazing music video. Want to recreate the moment yourself? Head down to Hoxton Street and put on your heaviest leather jacket. But please avoid bumping into grannies and jumping on car bonnets, we won't be held responsible!

2. The Prodigy – Firestarter – The Fat of the Land – Aldwych Tube Station

Known for its sinister appearance, this video was initially rejected as some channels refused to show it as it was too scary for children (it’s still quite scary to us adults now!) The music video, produced by Walter Stern shows frontman Keith Flint creeping around the underground looking a tad bit menacing. Once the song was paired with the manic music video, it achieved mass success across the UK but also broke into charts across Europe charting at Number 1 in Norway and Finland. Aldwych Station has been closed for many years so you can no longer get onto the tracks, sorry folks.

3. Bob Dylan – Subterranean Homesick Blues – Bring It All Back Home – Covent Garden

At the time of this songs release music videos or ‘promotional clip’s’ were unheard of. The video captures the singer holding cue cards which display the majority of the song’s lyrics. It’s an idea which has been replicated numerous times over the years but was done first in London. Want to drop some cue cards of your own? Dylan was stood behind The Savoy Hotel in Covent Garden.

4. The Human League – Love Action (I Believe In Love) – Dare – Warwick Avenue

Another promotional video now from The Human League which was released off the back of the bands massive hit, ‘Don’t You Want Me’. The video, which is similar to the 1968 film, ‘The Graduate’ shows the band take on acting roles rather than just performing. Although the acting is quite questionable, it's exactly that what makes the video so charming and memorable. Hop on the tube and head over to Warwick Avenue for this one, it was filmed by St. Saviour’s Church.

5. Kaiser Chiefs – Never Miss a Beat – Off With Their Heads – Thamesmead

The lads from Leeds made the trip down south and filmed their video for ‘Never Miss a Beat’ in Thamesmead, showing huge groups of teens running through council estates masked implying the stereotype of association of teens. One group is chased by a policeman and ultimately the video climaxes as the song does where the group come together to flawlessly perform a choreographed dance. As mentioned, the kids were in Thamesmead so slip on a mask, head down and get dancing.

6. Madness – Our House – The Rise & Fall – Willesden Junction

Shot in North-West London this video depicts an ordinary family life showing the band getting ready for work and school while the family relax and play squash. This great video shows the life of a family in the London suburbs which surprisingly was the only song from Madness’ repertoire with international success. The bands house was in North-West London, near to Willesden Junction and not too far from Wembley Stadium.

7. Coldplay – Fix You – X & Y – King's Cross

Despite being shot mainly in Bolton’s ‘Reebok Stadium’ X & Y had sections filmed in different locations across London; London Bridge, King’s Cross and Waterloo Bridge. Chris Martin who was born and formed the band in London walks across the city singing the song before joining the rest of the band on stage to perform for a crowd of thousands. Somehow Chris Martin managed to run up the steps at King’s Cross onto the stage in Bolton, so let’s see if you can manage that!

8. The Libertines – Don’t Look Back Into the Sun – The Libertines – Trafalgar Square

Although only making it to 11th in the UK Singles Charts this track from The Libertines is remembered as one of the greatest indie anthems of all time. The video is mainly an audience view of the band performing which is intended to be poorly shot however the group are also seen to be meandering through the streets of London starting at Trafalgar Square giving us the impression that the lads don’t have a care in the world. The Libertines were larking about in the famous West End so if you head down there please don’t follow their fashion sense… Please?

9. Rick Astley – Never Gonna Give You Up – Whenever You Need Somebody – Harrow

Astley’s mellow voice eased into homes throughout the country with this smooth classic which went onto win the Brit for the best single. But Astley also put in a memorable performance in the music video which shows Astley singing and dancing to this track in a classic 80’s style. Astley hit Number one in 21 different countries with this tune which you just can’t hate. If you’re interested in doing some jiving of your own make your way to the Borough of Harrow. And that’s right you have (sort of) been ‘rick rolled’.

10. The Who – The Kids Are Alright – My Generation – Hyde Park

Here's another example of music videos being embraced in the 1960’s. The Who’s video features themselves isolated in an empty Hyde Park performing the song to… well, no one but themselves. This hit didn’t have much initial success, however is recognised now as one of the best songs of the 1960’s which along with ‘My Generation’ meant that the band played a huge role in inspiring Mod culture for many years to come. If you want to be at the scene of The Who then get yourself to Hyde Park, only we can’t promise you it will be as empty this time around.

Of course we’ve no where near covered them all, so make sure you comment below with any we’ve missed and we'll add them to our map below!